A Daily Updating Blog of Important Events In History That Never Occurred Today.
Imagine what would be, if history had occurred a bit differently. Who says it didn't, somewhere? These fictional news items explore that possibility. Written by Alternate Historian

April 19

In 1865, following the Night of Terror brought by the Booth Conspiracy Abraham Lincoln summoned the US Congress into session on this the first Monday after Easter.

Booth Conspiracy brings Night of Terror, Part 2 by Ed, Allen W. McDonnell & Jeff ProvineIn a solemn address he paid his dutiful respects to the two dead national leaders, Vice-President Andrew Johnson and Secretary of State William Seward. Also his gratitude to the military policeman who had intercepted John Wilkes Booth at the Ford Theatre.

Having reflected on the events of April 14th, and after holding several rounds of intense discussions with the Cabinet, Lincoln had developed a robust set of proposals that would safeguard the Federal Government from a re-occurrence of such a future conspiracy. Accordingly, he was asking for a Constitutional Amendment that would make the post of Vice President equal to those of the Cabinet, a person appointed by the President to serve at his pleasure as the President of the Senate (the official title of the Vice President).

The Amendment easily passes the joint session of Congress by the necessary margin and was also passed quickly by the States of the Union making it part of the Constitution. From the election of 1868 onward people only elect the President, the Vice President and Cabinet Secretaries are appointed by the President with the Advice and Consent of the Senate. However in his auto-biography, Lincoln would reveal that an even more far-reaching proposal that was considered - the President to also appoint a new position, President of the House [1] as a second Vice President.



January 17

In 2001, on this day outgoing US President Albert Gore, Jr. issued a formal apology to the descendants of Captain Meriwether Lewis.

Meriwether Lewis Defeats Muggers, Redux By Ed, Scott Palter and Jeff ProvineOn the night of 11th October, 1809 he rested at the "Grinder's Stand", an inn on the Natchez Trace, seventy miles south-west of Nashville, Tennessee. But after leaving dinner, he retired only to be savagely attacked in his bedroom. He managed to drive off the unidentified muggers, but immediately discovered that they had made off with the journals that he was carrying to Washington, D.C. for publication.

Of course not long after his death in 1846, the "secret journals of Capt. Lewis" appeared. This narrative of the Lewis and Clark Expedition described the Corps of Discovery finding giants, the fountain of youth, and a tribe of "nearly white, blue-eyed" Indians descended from Prince Madoc of Wales.

Clearly at odds with the known facts, this account was of course a naked challenge to westward expansion. Conspiracy theorists suggested that the muggers were agents sent by the Federal Government to cover-up the truth of advanced indigenous civilization predating Columbus, but mainstream historians [1] suggested that too many people had traveled westward with Lewis and Clark for such revelations to be concealed.



October 11

In 1809, Captain Meriwether Lewis rested at the "Grinder's Stand", an inn on the Natchez Trace, seventy miles south-west of Nashville, Tennessee.

Meriwether Lewis Defeats Muggers, Redux By Ed, Scott Palter and Jeff ProvineAfter leaving dinner, he retired only to be savagely attacked in his bedroom. He managed to drive off the unidentified muggers, but immediately discovered that they had made off with the journals that he was carrying to Washington, D.C. for publication.

Of course not long after his death in 1846, the "secret journals of Capt. Lewis" appeared. This narrative of the Lewis and Clark Expedition described the Corps of Discovery finding giants, the fountain of youth, and a tribe of "nearly white, blue-eyed" Indians descended from Prince Madoc of Wales.

Clearly at odds with the known facts, this account was of course a naked challenge to westward expansion. Conspiracy theorists suggested that the muggers were agents sent by the Federal Government to cover-up the truth of advanced indigenous civilization predating Columbus, but mainstream historians [1] suggested that too many people had traveled westward with Lewis and Clark for such revelations to be concealed.



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© Today in Alternate History, 2013-. All characters appearing in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.