A Daily Updating Blog of Important Events In History That Never Occurred Today.
Imagine what would be, if history had occurred a bit differently. Who says it didn't, somewhere? These fictional news items explore that possibility. Written by Alternate Historian

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June 28

In 1778, on this day Major General Charles Lee was forced to withdrew his advanced guard from the Monmouth Court House in the face of overwhelming British opposition.
A reversal of the earliest post All Hail King Washington.

Long Live King LeeThe decision left Major General George Washington incandescent with rage, and he immediately called for the court martial of his second in command (Washington had wanted to test the abilities of Lee's troops, since they were among the first to be trained in European tactics by Baron von Steuben). Fortunately, knowing Lee's famous weakness for insubordination, his loyal officers managed to avoid an angry confrontation between the two men (married to Mohawk woman he was called "Chief Boiling Waters" by that tribe due to his foul temperament).

At the court martial in Englishtown, the blame for the failures of the day were placed squarely on General Washington's shoulders, ensuring that the vindicated Lee would succeed him as Commander in Chief of the Continental Army. Fate intervened, when a disheartened Washington was captured shortly thereafter (there were even rumours that he may have "turned coat". If so, this was ironic given that Lee was born in England unlike Washington who was a native Virginian).

Even if Lee and Washington could be considered equals in terms of military prowess, their mentalities were fundamentally different. Because Lee had absolutely no problem in accepting the crown when it was eventually offered to him at Philadelphia. After all, he was an Englishman.






© Today in Alternate History, 2013-. All characters appearing in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.