A Daily Updating Blog of Important Events In History That Never Occurred Today.
Imagine what would be, if history had occurred a bit differently. Who says it didn't, somewhere? These fictional news items explore that possibility. Written by Alternate Historian

Quick Links


Selected threads


Archive Navigator

January February March
April May June
July August September
October November December

Editor's Postbag     |     Feed


Site Meter


July 2

In 1187, on this day after months of bitter feuding the announcement in the Crusader War Council of a crazy, damn-fool decision to endanger the Frankish forces by moving the Army east of its defences triggered a fierce backlash against the eighteen months of misrule of the King of Jerusalem, Guy of Lusignan.

Victory of the CrossWith his fortress of Tiberius under siege, the troops under Raymond III of Tripoli had tried to sue for terms, provoking accusations of cowardice from Council members Gerard de Rideford and Raynald of Chatillon. Guy, who had only recently settled a major dispute with Raymond himself, wanted to attack immediately. But in fact, Raymond was willing to sacrifice his fortress for the sake of the Kingdom.

Raymond was right, Guy absolutely wrong. Saladin had calculated that because the Muslim forces were twice as big as the Crusader Army, his chances of success on an open battle field were much improved, even though the Franks had frequently won engagements despite being heavily outnumbered. Therefore his move against Tiberius was merely a feint to tempt the Crusaders out of their sound defences where they were protected from a much larger Army.

Just six years later, Saladin would die and while the Crusader states continued to face survival threats, at least one critical moment of danger had passed. Sensing this, Pope Urban II had almost died of shock when he received the news, and immediately took action to displace Guy from the throne.






© Today in Alternate History, 2013-. All characters appearing in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.