A Daily Updating Blog of Important Events In History That Never Occurred Today.
Imagine what would be, if history had occurred a bit differently. Who says it didn't, somewhere? These fictional news items explore that possibility. Written by Alternate Historian

Quick Links


Selected threads


Archive Navigator

January February March
April May June
July August September
October November December

Editor's Postbag     |     Feed


Site Meter


June 19

In 1968, on this day Mayor John V. Lindsay's Presidential Campaign was rocked by allegations of shadey business dealings that dated back to his widely regarded leadership of the Jamaica Bay Hurricane.

West Side Story
by Ed, Chris Oakley & Stan Brin
For months his platform of Liberal Republicanism had suffered from reported whisperings originating from inside his official residence at Gracie Mansion which described him as the most bleeding heart liberal, mayor in the City's history.

But in a suprising reversal, the architect of the smear campaign was revealed as William E. Miller, an obscure Congressman from Western New York who had been the surprise selection for Vice President at the 1964 Republican at the Cow Palace in California. In fact Lindsay had not withheld his support at the Convention to build his own profile, rather he was deeply shocked by the right-wing direction that the GOP was heading in. Matters had come to a head when Ronald Reagan had pulled out through illness, and Lindsay had been invited to deliver the platform address (although he retained the title "A Time for Choosing" he rewrote the entire speech). From that day Miller had bore a grudge because Lindsay had failed to recognize his own contribution towards the leadership of the crisis. And in fact the allegations were proven baseless, with construction contracts awarded on an equitable basis that enabled the City to recover by the time that Lindsay made the step up from Gracie Mansion To Pennsylvania Avenue.






© Today in Alternate History, 2013-. All characters appearing in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.