A Daily Updating Blog of Important Events In History That Never Occurred Today.
Imagine what would be, if history had occurred a bit differently. Who says it didn't, somewhere? These fictional news items explore that possibility. Written by Alternate Historian

'Trek '49' by Guest Historian Chris Oakley
Guest Historian Guest Historian Chris Oakley says, in this thread, we explore the idea of famed radio writer Arch Oboler creating "Star Trek". If you're interested in viewing samples of my other work why not visit the Changing the Times web site.


June 7

In 1949, on this day NBC Radio broadcast the debut episode of Arch Oboler's Star Trek; George Reeves, later to catapult to TV fame on Superman, did the voice of Captain Christopher Pike in that episode and would continue portraying the character until he left the series in the spring of 1951.

 - George Reeves
George Reeves


April 17

In 1951, on this day George Reeves did his final broadcast as Captain Pike on the Star Trek radio series.                                                                                              

 - George Reeves
George Reeves


April 18

In 1951, on this day Darren McGavin joined the cast of the Star Trek radio series as new Enterprise captain James Kirk.

 - Darren McGavin
Darren McGavin


June 4

In 1951, on this day the debut edition of the comic book version of the Star Trek radio series went on sale at news stands across the US.                                            

 - Star Trek
Star Trek


July 13

In 1957, on this day Star Trek made its television debut, starting a run that would span fifteen years and inspire two spinoff series along with an animated program and a number of feature films. Initially broadcast only in black and white, Trek began showing color episodes in 1964 and had gone entirely to color by 1967.

 - George Reeves
George Reeves


May 8

In 2009, on this day Paramount Pictures released J.J. Abrams' long-awaited movie adaptation of the hit radio and TV series Star Trek.

Star Trek #11 released, by Chris OakleyThe movie's premiere was the high point of a year-long celebration of the sixtieth anniversary of the pop cultural icon's creation by famed radio scriptwriter Arch Oboler, who had also produced the ghost story anthology series Lights Out! and the nuclear holocaust movie Five.

Following its 1949 debut, Trek made the jump to television in 1957, where it became a mainstay on NBC's prime-time scheduled for over fifteen years and led to three spinoffs plus a highly acclaimed animated TV series.



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© Today in Alternate History, 2013-. All characters appearing in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.